Germany's football match-fixing affair deepens

2nd February 2005, Comments 0 comments

2 February 2005 , BERLIN - Local prosecutors said on Wednesday that they are investigating 25 people on charges of organised fraud in connection with a match-rigging scandal that has rocked German football. Prosecutors said in a statement that the suspects are believed to have manipulated at least 10 matches in the first, second and third divisions as well as in the German cup to enable three brothers place successful bets on the games. Among the suspects are players from six clubs, none of them in the to

2 February 2005 

BERLIN - Local prosecutors said on Wednesday that they are investigating 25 people on charges of organised fraud in connection with a match-rigging scandal that has rocked  German football.

Prosecutors said in a statement that the suspects are believed to have manipulated at least 10 matches in the first, second and third divisions as well as in the German cup to enable three brothers place successful bets on the games.

Among the suspects are players from six clubs, none of them in the top flight.

Prosecutors said that the allegations are mainly based on testimony from one of the men charged, referee Robert Hoyzer, who admitted last week to having manipulated games and received money for it from gamblers.

This follows raids carried out across the country in connection with the football match-fixing affair, Berlin prosecutors confirmed on Wednesday.

Hoyzer's lawyer Stephan Holthoff-Pfoertner, in an interview with Die Zeit weekly made available ahead of Thursday's publication, said he expected the scandal to be of a bigger dimension than it is now.

ZDF television reported late on Tuesday that the prosecution was also looking at 40 betting companies and 300 betting offices in Germany.

Hoyzer admitted last week to having manipulated games he officiated in the German cup, second and third division and received money for it, reportedly from a Croatian betting group in Berlin.

Hoyzer has reportedly named 13 people and four clubs in connection with the affair. Players from Dynamo Dresden and Paderborn said they received EUR 15,000 and 10,000, respectively, from unknown people for victories.

Holthoff-Pfoertner said the scandal will further deepen and that the affair was not limited to Berlin, where Hoyzer and the three arrested men are based.

"Some people thought last week when all eyes were on Robert Hoyzer: 'We have found one, that's it, that's all. To be honest, I don't believe that at all," Holthoff-Pfoertner told Die Zeit.

Holthoff-Pfoertner said be believed that similar networks to that in Berlin were "in place in other regions as well" and that Hoyzer had never grasped the whole dimension of the issue.

"He did not see the dimension of what he got into," said Holthoff-Pfoertner, adding that he advised Hoyzer "to reveal everything, to give all names" to the prosecution in Berlin. 

DPA

Subject: German news
 

0 Comments To This Article