Germany to bolster anti-terrorism database

4th September 2006, Comments 0 comments

4 September 2006, BERLIN - Germany's government Monday agreed the framework for a terrorism database allowing access to information on suspects for both police and the intelligence services. Federal Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble will immediately begin working on a new anti-terror law taking into account the agreement between Berlin and Germany's 16 federal states, officials said. Giving both police and intelligence services equal access to personal information about suspects is a sensitive issue in

4 September 2006

BERLIN - Germany's government Monday agreed the framework for a terrorism database allowing access to information on suspects for both police and the intelligence services.

Federal Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble will immediately begin working on a new anti-terror law taking into account the agreement between Berlin and Germany's 16 federal states, officials said.

Giving both police and intelligence services equal access to personal information about suspects is a sensitive issue in Germany, given abuses under both the Nazis and by communist East Germany.

Germany's planned terrorist database will allow police and intelligence to more easily access a host of information on suspects under a two-tier system, said a statement. This includes the following:

- Membership in terrorist groups

- Firearms registration information

- Telecommunications and internet data

- Bank account and safety deposit box information

- School, university, and apprenticeship data

- Family status and religious affiliation

- Information on past loss of passport or ID card

- Travel data including visits to areas suspected of housing terrorist training camps.

There is sense of urgency over the new law following a failed terrorist attack in which crude propane gas tank bombs were set to explode on two German trains. The bombs were discovered by police on July 31.

Six people have been arrested in connection with the failed attack and Lebanon's state prosecution on Saturday issued preliminary charges against five Lebanese and a Syrian over the plot.

Four of the Lebanese are being held in Lebanon and one Lebanese and a Syrian national were arrested in Germany.

In a related development, interior ministers also agreed to expand the use of video cameras at German train stations, airports, and harbours.

The value of closed circuit TV was dramatically shown in July bombing bid after video footage of the suspects was released to the media in a bid to help police capture those believed to have set the bombs.

DPA

Subject: German news

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