Germany rejects war to forceIranian nuclear compliance

10th November 2004, Comments 0 comments

10 November 2004 , BERLIN - German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer, in remarks released on Wednesday, ruled out use of military force against Iran and moves to overthrow the Teheran government amid rising concern over its nuclear programme. "I think that for all those involved war is not an option," said Fischer in a Stern magazine interview, adding that this included both the United States and Israel. Fischer also rejected supporting Iranian opposition groups to overthrow of Iran's current leadership. "

10 November 2004  

BERLIN - German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer, in remarks released on Wednesday, ruled out use of military force against Iran and moves to overthrow the Teheran government amid rising concern over its nuclear programme.

"I think that for all those involved war is not an option," said Fischer in a Stern magazine interview, adding that this included both the United States and Israel.

Fischer also rejected supporting Iranian opposition groups to overthrow of Iran's current leadership.

"We are placing emphasis on the political process," said Fischer.

Talks between Iran and European Union (EU) heavyweights Britain, France and Germany to win a suspension of Teheran's nuclear programme have made progress in past days and a final agreement is expected later this week.

The EU's "Big Three" have warned Iran it risks UN Security Council sanctions if it fails to give up all activities with uranium by a 25 November deadline set by the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency.

But US remains deeply skeptical over the long-term value of any such pledge from Iran. American officials believe Teheran is still seeking to build nuclear weapons.

Jeffrey Gedmin, head of the US Aspen Institute in Berlin which has close ties to the American government, dubs the EU Big Three's approach an "axis of weakness."

"In truth, Germany's Iran policy has been bankrupt from nearly day one," said Gedmin in a commentary posted on the Aspen Institute's website.

"Bonn started the project in 1992 under the banner of 'Critical Dialogue'. While Germany and its European allies tried aid, trade, credits and diplomatic indulgences, the regmine in Teheran continued to support terrorism, repress the Iranian people, and clandestinely pursure nuclear weapons," says Gedmin.

"In 1999 the EU changed the name of the policy to 'Constructive Dialogue' ... Europe is nice to the mullahs, and when this fails, well, Europe tries to be a little nicer," he said, adding: "Germany has been allergic even to the idea of stepped up political pressure."

DPA

Subject: German news

 

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