Germany plans law to stop far-right march

10th February 2005, Comments 0 comments

11 February 2005, BERLIN - The German government aims to rush through a law to prevent rightwing extremists rallying at Berlin's Brandenburg Gate when the country marks the 60th anniversary of the end of World War II on 8 May, Interior Minister Otto Schily said. It is expected the legislation would limit the right to hold demonstrations and make it easier for authorities to prevent neo-Nazis marching near concentration camps and other sensitive areas. Speaking in the northern city of Kiel, Schily said he a

11 February 2005

BERLIN - The German government aims to rush through a law to prevent rightwing extremists rallying at Berlin's Brandenburg Gate when the country marks the 60th anniversary of the end of World War II on 8 May, Interior Minister Otto Schily said.

It is expected the legislation would limit the right to hold demonstrations and make it easier for authorities to prevent neo-Nazis marching near concentration camps and other sensitive areas.

Speaking in the northern city of Kiel, Schily said he aimed to get the law approved by the 8 May events when parliament will be commemorating the 60th anniversary of the war's end.

It is thought the legislation will also extend a ban on demonstrations around the Bundestag towards the landmark Brandenburg Gate and the Holocaust memorial.

Brandenburg Gate has played a prominent and highly symbolic role in German history and was used by the Nazis as a symbol for fascist Germany.

It is already feared rightwing extremist supporters of the National Democratic Party (NPD) will mar commemorations in Dresden on Sunday recalling the Allied bombing raids on the night of 13 February 1945.

The city is bracing for clashes, with about 7,000 NPD supporters, expected to march in the city to honour victims of what it has called a "bombing holocaust", while a counter-demonstration is planned by leftist groups.

The Saxony state parliament was embroiled in scandal last month when NPD speakers compared the British-led firebombing of Dresden to the Holocaust, and its deputies walked out of a memorial service for victims of Auschwitz.

The NPD won 9.2 percent of the vote to gain entry into the Saxony parliament in the September 2004 state elections.

DPA

Subject: German news 

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