Germany indicts al-Qaeda suicide-bomb suspects

6th December 2005, Comments 0 comments

6 December 2005, KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - Germany has indicted a trio of men who are suspected of plotting suicide bombings in Europe on behalf of al-Qaeda, and is to try them soon in the city of Duesseldorf.

6 December 2005

KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - Germany has indicted a trio of men who are suspected of plotting suicide bombings in Europe on behalf of al-Qaeda, and is to try them soon in the city of Duesseldorf.

Federal prosecutor Kay Nehm's office in the city of Karlsruhe announced Tuesday that under last week's indictment, two are accused of being al-Qaeda members and one of supporting a terrorist group.

The court will be told that Ibrahim Mohamed K., who lived in the riverside city of Mainz, was the recruiter who talked two Palestinian-born brothers, Yasser Abu-S., 32, and Ismail Abu-S., 28, into his cause. The brothers were described as currently stateless.

The full surnames of the suspects were withheld under German journalistic ethics guidelines.

There was shock in Germany in January at the arrest of K., who is believed to be a Syrian national and had not attracted attention before. The elder of the brothers was a promising Bonn medical student who was allegedly willing to destroy himself.

The younger brother, being prosecuted as a supporter, was arrested in May.

Police in Mainz said at the time they had vetted K. after the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, but had not spotted his terrorist connections.

All three men are also being accused of insurance fraud. They signed 10 life-insurance policies worth 1.3 million euros (1.5 million dollars) and applied for at least 23 more worth 3 million euros.

They intending to fake the death of the intended suicide bomber in a car crash in Egypt and claim the full sum, before he went elsewhere to blow himself up. Prosecutors said they did not know where the potential bombing target was.

The prosecutors say Ibrahim Mohamed K. was part of the al-Qaeda command structure, had been in touch with al-Qaeda boss Osama bin Laden and had fought U.S. troops in Afghanistan in 2001 and 2002.

He failed in efforts to acquire nuclear material, possibly for a so-called dirty bomb, with help from Islamists in Luxembourg.

DPA

Subject: German news

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