Germany indicts Croatian for 1983 assassination

13th December 2005, Comments 0 comments

13 December 2005, KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - Germany's federal prosecutors said Tuesday they have indicted a Croatian man who is suspected of helping assassinate an exiled Yugoslav dissident writer in 1983.

13 December 2005

KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - Germany's federal prosecutors said Tuesday they have indicted a Croatian man who is suspected of helping assassinate an exiled Yugoslav dissident writer in 1983.

Stjepan Djurekovic died of multiple gunshots near the southern German city of Munich in an attack organized by the secret services of former Yugoslavia, apparently because of his inside knowledge about the communist government in Belgrade.

Announcing the indictment, which was issued at the end of last month, the prosecutors in the southern city of Karlsruhe said Krunoslav P., 56, who is a Croatian citizen, would be tried as an accessory to murder in Munich. He was arrested in July.

Investigators believe he tipped off the gunman about Djurekovic's presence at a printing plant and provided a key to the building at Wolfratshausen near Munich. The gunman was never caught.

The accused, who has lived in Germany since 1971, posed as an opponent to the Belgrade government, was active in exile groups and won the trust of Djurekovic, the indictment says. But from 1975 on, he had been working for the SDB espionage service of Yugoslavia.

He edited a Croatian exile newspaper, Hrvatska Drzava, and had a printing plant that printed books by Djurekovic, a former marketing chief of a state enterprise, who fled Yugoslavia in 1982.

The attacker hid in the printing plant and shot the victim without warning on July 28, 1983, finishing him off with blows to the head.

The German investigators believe he was killed because of fears that his extensive inside connections in Belgrade would be so useful to Croats in exile that this would pose a danger to the Yugoslav state.

DPA

Subject: German news

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