Germany in vanguard of effort to cut CO2

16th February 2005, Comments 0 comments

16 February 2005 , BERLIN - German Environment Minister Juergen Trittin said on Wednesday his country remains in the vanguard of efforts to protect against global warming. In remarks to the radio station Deutschland Radio, Trittin countered claims that Germany would not be able to meet the carbon dioxide reduction targets set forth in the Kyoto Protocol which went into effect on Wednesday. With the US and Australia notable exceptions, 141 nations have pledged to reduce emission of greenhouse gases under te

16 February 2005 

BERLIN - German Environment Minister Juergen Trittin said on Wednesday his country remains in the vanguard of efforts to protect against global warming.

In remarks to the radio station Deutschland Radio, Trittin countered claims that Germany would not be able to meet the carbon dioxide reduction targets set forth in the Kyoto Protocol which went into effect on Wednesday.

With the US and Australia notable exceptions, 141 nations have pledged to reduce emission of greenhouse gases under terms of the treaty, which expires in 2012.

"I really cannot understand this talk which casts doubt on Germany's vanguard role in climate policy, given our performance which can stand up to international comparisons," Trittin said.

The Greens party minister said that over the past seven years Germany had cut its carbon dioxide emissions by 200 million tons, just about reaching its targets.

Germany could be particularly proud of the fact that private households and motor traffic had reduced CO2 emissions to below the level of the year 1990, he said.

His remarks came while Klaus Toepfer, head of the UN Environment Program urged the German government to step up its efforts.

"Germany also will have to do more if it is going to reliably achieve the goals set by Kyoto and by the common European Union policy," he told the daily paper Berliner Zeitung.

Under the Kyoto Protocol, Germany is obliged to reduce its carbon dioxide emissions by at least 21 percent.

DPA

Subject: German news 

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