Germany draws up new anti-terror data register

13th July 2005, Comments 0 comments

13 July 2005, BERLIN - In the wake of last week's bomb attacks on London, German Interior Minister Otto Schily is to submit to cabinet draft proposals for a new anti-terror data register for Germany, a ministry spokeswoman said Wednesday.

13 July 2005

BERLIN - In the wake of last week's bomb attacks on London, German Interior Minister Otto Schily is to submit to cabinet draft proposals for a new anti-terror data register for Germany, a ministry spokeswoman said Wednesday.

The aim is to compile information from police and intelligence services about terrorists with the plans for the data file coming as a poll released Wednesday showed that half of Germans fear terrorist attacks similar to those which rocked central London last Thursday.

Despite measures being in place to guard against terrorist threats, Schily earlier this week pointed to gaps in the German-wide exchange of the information between security agencies.

Germany's federal and state authorities have been battling it out for months about the scale of the proposed anti-terror register.

A year ago state and federal interior ministers agreed to the creation of a file to assemble information about Islamic groups and individuals in the nation. Tensions have arisen over how the information is to be presented.

The worries about terrorism come as Germany gears up for an early election, which is likely in mid-September. Security looks to become a major campaign issue in the wake of the London bombings.

This is shown by a new survey by the Forsa polling institute shows a majority of Germans fearful of their country becoming a target of terrorism.

In the poll, taken for the weekly Stern magazine and TV channel RTL, Forsa said 51 per cent of Germans are worried that their country could be the target of terrorism. The poll also pointed to concerns about the nation's readiness for a terrorist attack.

The Forsa poll, however, also shows that 49 per cent of Germans are not concerned about terrorist attacks in their country.

But only 35 per cent of those polled said they believed that German security services were adequately prepared for terrorist attacks on the country.

A majority said that the measures to combat terrorism in Germany were not sufficient.

DPA

Subject: German news

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