Germans seek damages forboy burned in Tunisia terror

1st September 2004, Comments 0 comments

1 September 2004 , HANOVER - The parents of a small German boy who suffered third-degree burns over much of his body in a terrorist attack in Tunisia two years ago appeared to be near an out-of-court settlement Wednesday for damages from a tour organizer. Court officials said the two sides had shown compromise on the plaintiffs' demands for EUR 100,000 in damages. At issue is a fire-bombing attack by suspected al-Qaeda terrorists against a Jewish synagogue-museum in Djerba in Tunisia on 11 April 2002, in

1 September 2004  

HANOVER - The parents of a small German boy who suffered third-degree burns over much of his body in a terrorist attack in Tunisia two years ago appeared to be near an out-of-court settlement Wednesday for damages from a tour organizer.

Court officials said the two sides had shown compromise on the plaintiffs' demands for EUR 100,000 in damages.

At issue is a fire-bombing attack by suspected al-Qaeda terrorists against a Jewish synagogue-museum in Djerba in Tunisia on 11 April 2002, in which 14 German tourists died and 17 were injured.

Among those injured was the boy, then three years old, who suffered third-degree burns to his face, arms and upper body.

Five-year-old Adrian Esper himself was not present Wednesday when Hanover State Superior Court took up the case against the 1-2-Fly tour company.

But his parents, Michael and Andrea Esper, told the court in a statement that Adrian had undergone 30 operations.

The 37-year-old mother said her son was forced to wear a custom-made silicon-formed face mask for "for more than a year to mould his facial features into shape".

He has been forced to attend a special pre-school "because children in the public kindergarten were afraid of him and didn't want even to touch him," she said.

The parents filed suit against the package tour company, alleging that the company put the lives of its customers at risk by knowingly sending them to a tourist site which was a likely terrorist target.

The package tour group, a subsidiary of Germany's giant TUI charter travel company, rejected the allegations.

In the wake of the Djerba attack, the German government set up a EUR 12 million fund for the victims. Each of the victims, including the child, received more than EUR 205,000  from that fund plus more than EUR 80,000 each from a Tunisian hotel owners' association fund.

None of the other victims of the fire-bombing have as yet filed suit against the package tour company.

DPA

Subject: German news
 

0 Comments To This Article