Germans can expect to live longer

2nd June 2004, Comments 0 comments

2 June 2004 , WIESBADEN - The general expectancy in Germany has risen again, reinforcing the trend in the country towards an aging population, latest government figures showed Wednesday. In the 2000-2002 period, women's actual life expectancy was 81.2 years, while that of men was 75.4 years, according to the Federal Statistics Office in Wiesbaden. These figures compare with the 81.1 years and 75.1 years, respectively, compiled in the preceding 1999-2001 period, the office said. The trend towards longer lif

2 June 2004

WIESBADEN - The general expectancy in Germany has risen again, reinforcing the trend in the country towards an aging population, latest government figures showed Wednesday.

In the 2000-2002 period, women's actual life expectancy was 81.2 years, while that of men was 75.4 years, according to the Federal Statistics Office in Wiesbaden.

These figures compare with the 81.1 years and 75.1 years, respectively, compiled in the preceding 1999-2001 period, the office said.

The trend towards longer life expectancy is expected to continue, the office said in projections for today's 60-year-olds. A woman of this age today can expect to live another 23.8 years, compared with 23.7 years in the previous projection.

A 60-year-old man in Germany can expect a further 19.7 years, up from the 19.5 years previously projected from 1999-2001 data, the office said.

Germany's average life expectancy ranks in the middle among the 25 European Union member countries. However, men fare better in the comparison than women, with men's life expectancy 0.6 years and women's 0.1 years above the overall average.

Sweden tops the EU in life expectancy for men, at 77.7 years, while Spain leads in women's life expectancy, at 83.1 years, the office report said.

By comparison, Japan is among the world leaders in life expectancy, with 78.3 years for men and 85.2 years for women.

The latest German life expectancy data have serious implications for the country's social structure, demographic analysts note. Amid a sinking birth rate, society is steadily growing older, which is putting financial strains on retirement and health care systems.

DPA

Subject: German news

 

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