'German war' nearly broke out in Prague in 1944

19th October 2005, Comments 0 comments

19 October 2005, PRAGUE - A Czech historian has found evidence that pro- and anti-Hitler factions within the German military were poised to battle each other in Prague after the attempted assassination of Adolf Hitler in mid-1944, a newspaper said Wednesday.

19 October 2005

PRAGUE - A Czech historian has found evidence that pro- and anti-Hitler factions within the German military were poised to battle each other in Prague after the attempted assassination of Adolf Hitler in mid-1944, a newspaper said Wednesday.

"Prague and central Bohemia were on the verge of a great slaughter," World War II historian Jan B. Uhlir told the daily Mlada fronta Dnes.

Uhlir's conclusion was based on an investigation of Czech and German archives.

He found that anti-Hitler factions in the Wehrmacht, or German Army, were ready to fight in the streets against pro-Hitler soldiers with the Waffen-SS in what was then Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia.

The fighting would have focused on Prague, which was considered a centre of unrest within the German military, Uhlir said. But the battle plan fizzled out when Hitler survived the July 20, 1944, attack.

Wehrmacht officers were later blamed for the failed attempt to kill Hitler by bombing his East Prussia headquarters.

Other historians interviewed by the newspaper confirmed that Uhlir had discovered several lost pieces of a historical puzzle about plans for a "German war" toward the end of World War II.

DPA

Subject: German news

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