German 'wanderlust' makes a comeback

14th January 2005, Comments 0 comments

14 January 2005, STUTTGART - Germans' famed penchant for travel made a strong comeback in 2004 with package tour bookings rising 5 percent and turnover in the holiday industry gaining more than 4 percent, officials said Friday. A day before the opening of the CMT tourism fair in Stuttgart, fair director Ulrich Kromer reported that 34.8 million Germans booked package vacations, while turnover in the industry reached EUR 18.6 billion in 2004. The upturn ended a two-year skid in travel by Germans, renowned fo

14 January 2005

STUTTGART - Germans' famed penchant for travel made a strong comeback in 2004 with package tour bookings rising 5 percent and turnover in the holiday industry gaining more than 4 percent, officials said Friday.

A day before the opening of the CMT tourism fair in Stuttgart, fair director Ulrich Kromer reported that 34.8 million Germans booked package vacations, while turnover in the industry reached EUR 18.6 billion in 2004.

The upturn ended a two-year skid in travel by Germans, renowned for their "wanderlust", after the tourism industry was hit by the scare of terrorism after 11 September 2001, by the economic downturn and by the SARS epidemic in Asia.

The CMT travel show in Stuttgart, running from 15 to 23 January, features more than 1,800 exhibitors from 81 countries. The fair is expected to draw some 200,000 visitors, Kromer said.

Last year's figures, while encouraging, were well short of the record numbers posted in the travel season running from November 2000 to October 2001. Then, the German tourism sector registered 37.4 million package travellers and revenues of over EUR 20 billion.

The German Travel Agents and Tour Operators Association DRV projected a further 5 percent growth for the travel industry in 2005. A survey of its members showed two-thirds expecting higher turnover, the DRV said.

Special attention at this year's CMT in Stuttgart will be paid to exhibitors from the tsunami-struck countries of Sri Lanka, India, Malaysia, Thailand and the Maldives, Kromer said.

"We should not punish these countries by having tourists staying away from them," he said. Tourism in the southern Asia region assured some 19 million jobs. On the Maldives, two out of every three jobs depended on the travel industry.

DPA

Subject: German news

 

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