German suspect 'led Nazi killing spree'

19th March 2004, Comments 0 comments

19 March 2004 , MUNICH - Authorities in Germany have filed murder charges against an 86-year-old alleged leader of a Nazi unit which killed at least 164 villagers in Slovakia during World War II. Ladislav Niznansky, arrested in Munich on 16 January is charged with murdering 146 people, including 51 children, in the Slovak towns of Ostry Grun and Klak in January 1945. He is also accused of ordering the execution of 18 Jews who were hiding in town of Ksinna a month later. Born a Slovak, he became a German ci

 

19 March 2004

MUNICH - Authorities in Germany have filed murder charges against an 86-year-old alleged leader of a Nazi unit which killed at least 164 villagers in Slovakia during World War II.

Ladislav Niznansky, arrested in Munich on 16 January is charged with murdering 146 people, including 51 children, in the Slovak towns of Ostry Grun and Klak in January 1945. He is also accused of ordering the execution of 18 Jews who were hiding in town of Ksinna a month later.

Born a Slovak, he became a German citizen in 1996 after the routine screening of applicants for German citizenship failed to uncover his alleged Nazi past.

He was head of the notorious Edelweiss anti-resistance unit. The unit’s killing sprees are well documented.

Historians confirm that a Captain Ladislav Niznansky and his elite Edelweiss unit made up of Slovaks hunted down partisans and carried out reprisals against villagers who supported them.

In the most-publicised incident, the unit captured US and British officers in 1944, who had parachuted into Nazi-controlled Slovakia.

Joseph Morton, a war correspondent for the Associated Press news agency, was among those taken prisoner and the entire group was executed in the Nazi concentration camp at Mauthausen, Austria, in January 1945. Morton was the only war correspondent to be executed during the conflict.

A court in Czechoslovakia convicted Niznansky in absentia in 1962. The Slovak government alerted Munich prosecutors to his presence in 2001. They then launched an investigation, searching through archives in the Czech Republic and Slovakia which ended in his arrest.

DPA

Subject: German News 

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