German spies 'didn't help' Iraq bomb targeting

13th January 2006, Comments 0 comments

13 January 2006, BERLIN - Germany's parliamentary intelligence oversight committee added its voice Friday to the official rejection of media reports that the country's spies helped target U.S. bombs during the Iraq war which then-chancellor Gerhard Schroeder strongly opposed.

13 January 2006

BERLIN - Germany's parliamentary intelligence oversight committee added its voice Friday to the official rejection of media reports that the country's spies helped target U.S. bombs during the Iraq war which then-chancellor Gerhard Schroeder strongly opposed.

"The intelligence control board found no evidence that members of the Federal Intelligence Agency (BND) ... took part in targeting or directing U.S. armed forces," said a statement by the Bundestag, parliament's lower house, after a closed-door meeting with German intelligence chiefs.

Earlier, BND President Ernst Uhrlau said the few German agents who remained in Baghdad during the 2003 Iraq war played no role either in targeting bombing raids or the hunt for Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein.

The parliamentary committee expressly rejected a report in the Los Angeles Times on Thursday which alleged that German spies provided the mistaken intelligence tip which led to an April 7, 2003 attack by a U.S. B-1 bomber with four satellite-guided bombs on a restaurant where Saddam Hussein was believed to be eating with his two sons.

The attack left at least 12 people dead, but not Saddam or his sons.

Nevertheless, the committee said it had agreed to summon the agents who had been based in Baghdad at the time to testify.

Opposition leaders in Berlin are calling for a probe into the allegations and a special parliamentary session is scheduled to be held on January 18 to discuss the BND's role in Iraq.

DPA

Subject: German news

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