German scientists help to stem AIDS

3rd January 2005, Comments 0 comments

3 January 2005, HAMBURG - German scientists said on Monday they had discovered a new inhibitor to stop the spread of the AIDS virus in the body. They said that unlike other inhibitors, it blocks production of a natural human enzyme, deoxyhypusine synthase, which is essential to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The substance they found slows the spread of AIDS but does not cure it. The find was announced by the Heinrich Pette Institute of Experimental Virology and Immunology at Hamburg University and

3 January 2005

HAMBURG - German scientists said on Monday they had discovered a new inhibitor to stop the spread of the AIDS virus in the body.

They said that unlike other inhibitors, it blocks production of a natural human enzyme, deoxyhypusine synthase, which is essential to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The substance they found slows the spread of AIDS but does not cure it.

The find was announced by the Heinrich Pette Institute of Experimental Virology and Immunology at Hamburg University and is to be written up in this month's issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

HIV cannot exist alone, but requires human cells to lodge in and reproduce.

The scientists, led by Ilona Hauber, said most other inhibitors currently used against AIDS target the enzymes of the virus itself, and were running into growing resistance from the virus.

The research is being conducted jointly with the German university of Erlangen and an associated company, Axxima Pharmaceuticals.

An estimated 40 million people worldwide are infected with HIV.

DPA

Subject: German news

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