German referees reject match video evidence

11th January 2005, Comments 0 comments

13 January 2005, HAMBURG - German referees have said that they are in favour of having computer chips in balls, but remain against the idea of using video evidence during matches. FIFA last week floated the idea of placing a computer chip into a ball after a high-profile incident during a Premiership game between Manchester United and Tottenham. During the match United's keeper Roy Carroll fumbled a long-range shot from Spurs' midfielder Miguel Pedro Mendes, but even though television footage showed that t

13 January 2005

HAMBURG - German referees have said that they are in favour of having computer chips in balls, but remain against the idea of using video evidence during matches.

FIFA last week floated the idea of placing a computer chip into a ball after a high-profile incident during a Premiership game between Manchester United and Tottenham.

During the match United's keeper Roy Carroll fumbled a long-range shot from Spurs' midfielder Miguel Pedro Mendes, but even though television footage showed that the ball had clearly crossed the line, the goal was not given as the referee waved play on.

The chairman of the German referees board, Volker Roth, said that he would welcome a new ball. "I am in favour of anything that can help us. For instance, if a ball has a chip and we receive a signal say on our watches, that would be positive."

Eugen Strigel, who is in charge of referee training, said he thinks such an innovation would be good. "If the system is foolproof, we referees would favour something like that."

International referees seem to concur with their German counterparts. "If technical innovations have advanced, we should use them," FIFA referee Urs Meier said.

The German referees, however, once again said they were not in favour of video evidence being used. "Football is a flowing game that should not be stopped all the time," Roth said.

Computer chips in balls could be introduced sooner than expected. The controlling body, FIFA, issued a statement a few days ago in which they said that the body that is responsible for drawing up the laws governing the sport, the International Football Association Board, is to discuss goal line technology at their next meeting in February.

The Board will receive a presentation on a new technical proposal and a demonstration of the system is also planned at a time and place yet to be decided.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter had earlier in an interview also expressed his support for a change. "We need a system of technical control for the question whether a goal has been scored or not."

The technical aspects of the chips have already been dealt with. A German institute has developed a chip over the last five years which can be placed into a football. Test results have been positive and the sports goods manufacturer adidas has produced a ball for the chip.

An official of the institute said that the chip transmits the exact position of the ball up to 2,000 times per second.

DPA

Subject: German news

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