German officials 'say Abdul Rahman unstable'

3rd April 2006, Comments 0 comments

3 April 2006, HAMBURG - Abdul Rahman, the Afghan whose prosecution for converting to Christianity led to worldwide controversy, was judged to be mentally unstable by German officials who interviewed him six years ago, a German news magazine reported Saturday.

3 April 2006

HAMBURG - Abdul Rahman, the Afghan whose prosecution for converting to Christianity led to worldwide controversy, was judged to be mentally unstable by German officials who interviewed him six years ago, a German news magazine reported Saturday.

Defying Afghan Islamist politicians, Kabul officials released Abdul Rahman this week and he was whisked out of the country to asylum in Italy. The account in Der Spiegel backs up the Kabul officials' view that he was not mentally competent to be tried.

Der Spiegel said there were accounts going back years of Abdul Rahman being violent and disturbed.

In February 2000 he had entered Germany illegally and claimed political asylum. The German official who interviewed him at the time noted that he seemed "very confused."

The magazine quoted his brother as saying, "Abdul Rahman has been mad for years." The illness had begun in the early 1990s. "He has had delusions the whole time that someone is persecuting him and wants to kill him."

The relative said Abdul Rahman had physically attacked his wife, his children and his father. A doctor in Pakistan had certified in 1991 that he was "pathologically jealous" and "delusive."

In its report to hit the streets on Monday, the weekly magazine said Abdul Rahman had spent seven months of 2000 in a refugee hostel in Germany's southern state of Bavaria.

Western nations protested when he was prosecuted under Sharia law for abandoning Islam to become a Christian. This is punishable in Afghanistan with death. He was released from a Kabul prison on Monday after a supreme court judge ruled that he was not legally sane.

DPA

Subject: German news

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