German musicians issue 'no copy protection' label

9th January 2006, Comments 0 comments

9 January 2006, AACHEN, GERMANY - A union of German pop musicians has joined a crusade against unpopular copy-prevention technology, saying Monday it would issue an "unprotected" sticker to advertise CDs that can be easily copied.

9 January 2006

AACHEN, GERMANY - A union of German pop musicians has joined a crusade against unpopular copy-prevention technology, saying Monday it would issue an "unprotected" sticker to advertise CDs that can be easily copied.

"The first artists are already testing it. They want to tell customers: you can listen to this music and play it where you want," said Klaus Quirini, president of the Association of Germany Music-Makers VDM.

The campaign is a challenge to the major recording studios which have tried a variety of secret codes on CDs that spoil attempts to make copies. They aim to prevent buyers sharing music with friends.

Last month Sony had to abandon a new anti-copying technology that opened up US personal computers to a virus. There has been an emotional debate in Germany, where making private backups is legally allowed and many people want to copy CDs onto their MP3 players.

Quirini, a lawyer, said his group believed the sticker would encourage sales.

"Instead of investing billions of dollars in the war between copy- protection developers and hackers, they should publicize the value of intellectual property and say what is allowed and what not," he said.

He said this should be explained, especially to young people, without threats.

"A CD that you cannot play on the personal computer or in the car is a nuisance that deters you from buying again," he added.

He said several musicians not signed up by the big music companies and some independent labels were testing the sticker.

"If it proves a success, we'll promote the logo further," he said, contending that copy-prevention did not increase record sales whereas the "unprotected" sticker might.

DPA

Subject: German news

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