German leftist leader calls for 'bossnappings'

25th April 2009, Comments 0 comments

Die Linke (The Left), a loose-knit grouping of former East German communists and disaffected Social Democrats, is hoping to tap into public anger in elections on September 27 as Germany faces its worst postwar recession.

Berlin -- The leader of Germany's far-left Die Linke party called on Friday for workers to take a leaf out of their French comrades' books and kidnap their bosses.

"When French workers are angry they lock up their managers. I would like to see that happen here too, so that they notice there is anger out there, that people are scared about their livelihoods," Oskar Lafontaine said on public radio WDR.

Lafontaine, a former chairman of the Social Democrats who are junior partners in the current German government, served as finance minister under Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder from 1998 to 1999.

He abruptly quit Schroeder's cabinet because he found its policies too centrist.

France has been hit by a mini-wave of so-called "bossnappings" in recent weeks with disgruntled employees angry at losing their jobs and other restructuring measures in response to the recession.

Despite a warning from the head of Germany's trade union federation this week and a left-winger running for president, experts see the risk of serious social unrest in Europe's biggest economy as low.

Die Linke (The Left), a loose-knit grouping of former East German communists and disaffected Social Democrats, is hoping to tap into public anger in elections on September 27 as Germany faces its worst postwar recession.

AFP/Expatica

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