German expat named Sweden's 'top immigrant'

10th January 2006, Comments 0 comments

10 January 2006, STOCKHOLM - German-born Queen Silvia has been named number one immigrant in Sweden, a Swedish-language magazine written and produced mainly by second generation immigrants said Tuesday.

10 January 2006

STOCKHOLM - German-born Queen Silvia has been named number one immigrant in Sweden, a Swedish-language magazine written and produced mainly by second generation immigrants said Tuesday.

Gringo, a quarterly magazine, was started in 2004. Its editor Zanyar Adami was last year awarded an "innovator of the year" media prize for the multicultural publication which has introduced readers to slang and vocabulary used by many immigrant youths.

Queen Silvia was asked if she felt Swedish, and said she did. "It is like when you are expecting another child. Your expectations are high and you wonder if there is room enough to love the child as much. When you have the third child it shows that you can love that too, and that is how I feel about Brazil, Germany and Sweden."

The 62-year-old queen was born in Heidelberg, Germany but spent 10 years with her family in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

"The years (1947-1957) in Brazil were very important for me and my development, just like the years in Germany. So all that is carried within you. Now I am in Sweden, I am married to a Swede and our children are born here."

The queen's mother was Brazilian, her father was German.

The queen met King Carl XVI Gustaf during the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, and fell for his "good sense of humour". They were engaged in March 1976 and married in June the same year.

Fluent in six languages, the queen speaks Swedish with an accent. She said she was in her early 30s when she started to learn the language. In addition to Swedish, she speaks German, English, French, Spanish and Portuguese.

Asked to say something about traits in Swedes she dislikes, the queen said that "other cultures are more spontaneous and Swedes are more reserved," but the queen said she did not feel that Swedes were "overbearing, strict or a little boring".

Though by definition second generation immigrants, the queen said her three children - Crown Princess Victoria, Prince Carl Philip and Princess Madeleine - did not feel divided over their nationalities. "They feel Swedish, they were born here," she said.

DPA

Subject: German news

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