German disguises himself as terracotta warrior

18th September 2006, Comments 0 comments

18 September 2006, BEIJING - A German art student disguised as one of China's famed terracotta warriors fooled police briefly before being discovered and forcibly removed from the pit housing about 2,000 ancient, life-sized pottery warriors and horses. Pablo Wendel, 26, said Monday that he hadn't jumped into the pit over the weekend as part of an art action but out of a desire to feel part of an old culture. "It was an enthusiasm of mine to be a part of the army," the Stuttgarter told Deutsche Press-Agentu

18 September 2006

BEIJING - A German art student disguised as one of China's famed terracotta warriors fooled police briefly before being discovered and forcibly removed from the pit housing about 2,000 ancient, life-sized pottery warriors and horses.

Pablo Wendel, 26, said Monday that he hadn't jumped into the pit over the weekend as part of an art action but out of a desire to feel part of an old culture.

"It was an enthusiasm of mine to be a part of the army," the Stuttgarter told Deutsche Press-Agentur dpa. 

Posing motionless and unblinking after jumping into the pit, Wendel was able to remain hidden for a few minutes before police could differentiate him from the Xian historical warriors. 

The performance art student studying at Hangzhou in eastern China had designed a gown and hat similar to those once worn by Emperor Qinshihuang's warriors and even brought a rectangular pedestal to stand on.

Although he posed motionless in the pit, the authorities eventually found him, Wendel said.

"The real army came and pulled me out of there," he said, adding, however, that he didn't make it easy.

He refused to leave and froze like the statues he was imitating, and six officials were needed to carry him out "as if he was a log," the state-run Xinhua News Agency said.

The police then questioned the student, who has had a dream since childhood of being part of the terracotta army, and warned him in a friendly manner that his stunt should not be repeated, Wendel said.

"It was then I realized what a stupid thing I had done," the student said. "I didn't want to damage anything, and I was very careful."

Because no damage was done to the thousands of other warriors, police decided not to press charges because Wendel was "clearly passionate about the warriors" and his actions only warranted "serious criticism and education," Xinhua said.

After confiscating the military outfit, police sent Wendel back to his university in Hangzhou.

DPA

Subject: German news

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