German court rejects terrorist damages claim

27th October 2004, Comments 0 comments

27 October 2004 , HANOVER - A German court rejected Wednesday a claim against a package holiday company for damages after a customer was seriously hurt in an 11 April 2002 bombing by al-Qaeda in Tunisia. Lawyers for Adrian Esper, 6, who lost 40 percent of his skin, had contended that 1-2-Fly, a subsidiary of the world's biggest tours company, TUI of Germany, should have warned the family before they left Germany that terrorists might strike. But presiding judge Britta Knuellig-Dingeldey told a state court

27 October 2004  

HANOVER - A German court rejected Wednesday a claim against a package holiday company for damages after a customer was seriously hurt in an 11 April 2002 bombing by al-Qaeda in Tunisia.

Lawyers for Adrian Esper, 6, who lost 40 percent of his skin, had contended that 1-2-Fly, a subsidiary of the world's biggest tours company, TUI of Germany, should have warned the family before they left Germany that terrorists might strike.

But presiding judge Britta Knuellig-Dingeldey told a state court in the German city of Hanover that, "the heightened risk after 2001 of being hurt as a tourist by a terrorist attack", was common knowledge.

A tanker truck parked outside La Ghriba synagogue in Djerba, Tunisia exploded on 11 April 2002, killing 22 tourists and Tunisians. After the verdict, TUI said that as a goodwill gesture, it would pay for Esper and six other injured children to attend college.

DPA

Subject: German news

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