German arrested in Libyan nuclear probe

26th August 2004, Comments 0 comments

27 August 2004 , KARLSRUHE - Authorities in Germany have arrested a 65-year-old German businessman in connection with an investigation into illegal equipment for Libya's nuclear programme. The suspect was detained at his home in Hesse during a raid by federal investigators on Wednesday, said German Chief Federal Prosecutor Kay Nehm. The German high court issued an arrest warrant Thursday against the businessman. He faces charges of attempted treason and illegally aiding and abetting development of nuclear

27 August 2004

KARLSRUHE - Authorities in Germany have arrested a 65-year-old German businessman in connection with an investigation into illegal equipment for Libya's nuclear programme.

The suspect was detained at his home in Hesse during a raid by federal investigators on Wednesday, said German Chief Federal Prosecutor Kay Nehm.

The German high court issued an arrest warrant Thursday against the businessman.

He faces charges of attempted treason and illegally aiding and abetting development of nuclear weaponry. Under German law, it is illegal to export equipment or technology to certain developing countries that could be used for weapons purposes.

The warrant by the Bundesgerichtshof, the highest court in Germany dealing with civil and criminal issues, comes a day after Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder announced plans to visit Libya this autumn following Tripoli's agreement to pay USD 35 million in compensation to victims of a 1986 bombing in Berlin.

In a further development, an Economics Ministry spokeswoman said the government on Thursday would approve reinstating Hermes export guarantee credits to German firms selling goods to Libya.

The moves come after Libya hammered out a USD 35 million compensation deal with lawyers of European nationals injured and killed in the terrorist attack on a disco in west Berlin which was popular with U.S. soldiers.

The bomb blast on 5 April 1986, killed two US servicemen and a Turkish woman and injured more than 200 people. In retaliation, the United States carried out airstrikes against targets in Libya a few weeks later.

A Berlin court that jailed the bombers in 2001 ruled the Libyan intelligence service was the instigator.

Tripoli has already agreed to pay a total of USD 2.7 billion to families of people killed in the 1988 bombing of an airliner over Lockerbie, Scotland, and similar damages for the destruction of a French airliner in Africa.

DPA

Subject: German news
 

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