German, US NGOs present world hunger report

13th October 2006, Comments 0 comments

13 October 2006, Berlin (dpa) - Warfare and armed conflict have devastating ramifications in the fight against hunger, according to a report presented by Deutsche Welthungerhilfe and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Berlin on Friday. Data collected from 97 developing nations and 22 transition countries from the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe showed the 10 who fared worst were in sub-Saharan Africa and were affected directly or indirectly by war or its repercussions. The w

13 October 2006

Berlin (dpa) - Warfare and armed conflict have devastating ramifications in the fight against hunger, according to a report presented by Deutsche Welthungerhilfe and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Berlin on Friday.

Data collected from 97 developing nations and 22 transition countries from the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe showed the 10 who fared worst were in sub-Saharan Africa and were affected directly or indirectly by war or its repercussions.

The worst affected were Congo, Eritrea and Burundi.

Burundi, which has been in a state of civil war for the last decade, is last on the list. In addition to war, lack of investment in agriculture, health and education accounts for a negative effect.

The report and the ranking of the 119 countries are based on an index developed by the Washington-based IFPRI, which takes into account child mortality rates and undernourishment, and compares the development of the countries over a period of about 20 years.

"The index reflects the various manifestations of hunger," said Dr Joachim Braun, the institute's director. "The ranking of the countries aims to boost the political will of individual states by creating positive competition in the struggle against hunger."

Ingeborg Schaeuble, Welthungerhilfe's chairwoman, said stable countries like Ghana have managed to reduce hunger, malnutrition and the child mortality rate. Similarly, other post-war countries like Ethiopia, Mozambique and Angola have made notable progress over the past 10 years.

"It is, however, wrong to think that economic progress alone is enough to reduce hunger," said Schaeuble, who is the wife of German Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble.

"These countries cannot make headway without investing in agriculture, health and education. This is particularly applicable to countries which have endured acute crises and war," she said.

DPA

Subject: German news

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