'German-Jewish history more than just Holocaust'

20th June 2005, Comments 0 comments

20 June 2005, LUEBECK - The prime minister for the German state of Schleswig-Holstein, Peter Harry Carstensen, on Sunday called for German-Jewish history to be viewed as more than the history of the Holocaust. Speaking at a ceremony marking the 125 anniversary of Luebeck's synagogue, Carstensen said the mass murder of Jews by the Nazis during World War II was not the sum total of German-Jewish interaction. The Luebeck synagogue was first dedicated on June 10, 1880 and was the only synagogue in Schleswig-Ho

20 June 2005

LUEBECK - The prime minister for the German state of Schleswig-Holstein, Peter Harry Carstensen, on Sunday called for German-Jewish history to be viewed as more than the history of the Holocaust.

Speaking at a ceremony marking the 125 anniversary of Luebeck's synagogue, Carstensen said the mass murder of Jews by the Nazis during World War II was not the sum total of German-Jewish interaction.

The Luebeck synagogue was first dedicated on June 10, 1880 and was the only synagogue in Schleswig-Holstein that was not destroyed by Germany's rightwing National Socialist party.

The Vice President of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, Charlotte Knoblauch, also said Germans and Jews were bound by a common spiritual and cultural history.

"The destruction of the synagogues in 1938 ended the most fruitful part of German-Jewish history," she said. "But Jewish culture must not be reduced to the time of its annihilation."

German President Hoerst Koehler in a written greeting, said the celebration was a sign that it was possible for persons of different persuasions to live together in Germany.

Among the attendees of the ceremony was Salomon Carlebach, the grandson of one of the synagogue's founders.

Carlebach, who lives in Israel, said that until 1933, when Hitler came to power, his grandfather like other rabbis and members of the Jewish community was a highly respected citizen of Luebeck.

The Luebeck Jewish community today numbers around 700 persons, most of whom are immigrants from the former Soviet Union.

DPA

Subject: German news

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