George Michael says bring back the '80s

17th February 2005, Comments 0 comments

17 February 2005, BERLIN - Along with snow flurries, singer George Michael swept into town for the 55th Berlin Film Festival where a documentary on his life was shown. "This is like seeing my life in review," said the 41-year-old singer best known for his steamy 1980s hit "Let's Talk About Sex" and for his scandalous 1990s run-in with the law at a gay cruising public lavatory in southern California. "Let's face it, the '80s are over," said George from behind sunglasses, a glinting silver Christian crucifix

17 February 2005

BERLIN - Along with snow flurries, singer George Michael swept into town for the 55th Berlin Film Festival where a documentary on his life was shown.

"This is like seeing my life in review," said the 41-year-old singer best known for his steamy 1980s hit "Let's Talk About Sex" and for his scandalous 1990s run-in with the law at a gay cruising public lavatory in southern California.

"Let's face it, the '80s are over," said George from behind sunglasses, a glinting silver Christian crucifix along with a strand of gleaming black Moslem prayer beads slung around his manly throat.

"The whole genre that made me and artists like me famous is dead," he told a news conference after the screening of "George Michael: A Different Story" directed by Southan Morris.

But he said he has no interest in trying to compete with Robbie Williams for the hearts of post-Millennium fans.

"I think the future is a much more behind-the-scenes affair for me," he said in explaining his absence from the public eye.

"That won't really be a matter of privacy, it will just be a matter of me not being around," he said. "I just thought it was very important to explain myself before I disappear."

The feature film lays out Michael's life with no punches spared. It traces the good times when he sold millions of records and amassed tens of millions of dollars in the bank.

But it also goes into detail about his "dark secret" - being gay while his largely female fans idolised him as a sex symbol.

"I thought, 'Oh my God, I'm a massive star and I think I may be a poof. This is not going to end well'," he said in the film.

When he was busted for allegedly making sexual advances to an undercover cop in Beverly Hills, Michael said he was almost relieved that he had been outed.

The film also delves into the private grief of a surprisingly very private man: the loss in 1993 of his Brazilian boyfriend Anselmo Feleppa to AIDS.

"I remember looking at the sky and saying: 'Don't do this to me'," Michael said of his initial reaction upon learning of Feleppa's condition.

He had barely recovered from that blow and was riding high with a new hit "Jesus to a Child" when his outspoken opposition to the Iraq war caused his popularity to plummet in America.

"I knew I was taking a chance by speaking out against the war," Michael recalled, "but I was absolutely floored by the intensity of the attacks on my by the American media."

That said, he insisted he would never be reluctant to speak out on any subject he felt strongly about ever again, not after having failed to speak out about his sexual orientation for so many years.

"That changed everything," he said about his having been outed by the Beverly Hills police. "It's made me much more open about a lot of things in my life."

He said the most important things in his life now are his boyfriend Kenny Goss and his music.

"And I'm not sure in which order," he said.

Asked whether he welcomed the retro-'80s trend in music, Michael flashed his famous smile and quipped, "Sure, as long as '80s fashions don't come back."

DPA

Subject: German news 
 

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