G8 close meeting with anti-terror vow, Africa aid

8th July 2005, Comments 0 comments

8 July 2005, EDINBURGH - Leaders of the world's top G8 industrial nations Friday wrapped up three days of talks overshadowed by the London terror attacks with a joint vow to fight terrorism.

8 July 2005

EDINBURGH - Leaders of the world's top G8 industrial nations Friday wrapped up three days of talks overshadowed by the London terror attacks with a joint vow to fight terrorism.

Group of Eight (G8) leaders pledged to give an extra USD 50 billion in development aid by 2010, with half the funds going to Africa. They also promised urgent measures to combat global warming.

With the London bomb explosions on their minds, leaders of the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Canada, Japan and Russia said terrorism would not prevail.

"We will not allow violence to change our societies," said a G8 statement, adding: "The terrorists will not succeed."

Showing their solidarity with G8 nations, the leaders of China, India, Brazil, Mexico and South Africa as well as other African nations said they were equally committed to fighting terrorism.

"The politics that we represent will win and triumph over terrorism," said British Prime Minister and G8 summit host Tony Blair.

"We speak today in the shadow of terrorism but it will not obscure what we came to achieve," Blair said, adding that terrorists wanted not only to kill and maim innocent people but "to put despair and anger and hatred into people's hearts."

"It is hope that is the alternative to this hatred," the British premier said.

Blair said the summit was proof that G8 leaders were committed to changing the world. The G8 meeting was "a beginning not an end", Blair underlined.

The summit agreed a breakthrough summit deal on spending an extra USD 50 billion in development aid by 2010, a move that Blair said was a sign of the G8's "solidarity" with Africa.

Blair insisted that the Africa aid package would help save lives in Africa but warned that implementation of pledges was key to fight poverty.

"It is not the end of poverty but it is the hope that it can be ended," Blair underlined.

The summit had not achieved all the goals set out by pro- development activists, but the new aid plan for Africa represented progress, Blair insisted.

"It is the definitive expression of our collective will to act in the face of death, disease and conflict," Blair said, adding that G8 leaders would also help set up a new peacekeeping force in Africa.

In return African governments had agreed to practice good governance, he said.

The G8 summit proved positive "despite all the tragedy", German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder said.

In spite of the devastating bomb attacks in London, important issues such as aid for Africa, more environmental protection and stimuli for the world's economic had been initiated, Schroeder said.

"I believe that despite all the tragedy surrounding this summit, it has been successful," the chancellor said at the close.

The G8 focus on Africa followed intense pressure from aid charities, rock stars and celebrities who campaigned long and hard for an increase in aid for the continent.

G8 leaders agreed on an action plan to combat global warming and decided to hold talks with the world's emerging economies on slashing harmful greenhouse gas emissions.

A first meeting with China, India, Brazil, Mexico and South Africa on ways of tackling climate change will be held in Britain on November 1.

The deal is expected to end years of transatlantic feuding over the merits of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on curbing global warming which the U.S. opposes.

The pledge also included a first-ever recognition by U.S. President George W. Bush that there was scientific evidence to prove the global climate was changing because of harmful greenhouse gas emissions.

G8 leaders vowed to act with "resolve and urgency" to tackle global warming, adding that efforts would focus on "reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving the global environment, enhancing energy security and cutting air pollution."

G8 leaders promised to improve energy efficiency and development new, cleaner energy technologies - a priority for the U.S.

Leaders of the exclusive club decided Thursday to continue their summit agenda despite shock over the London bomb explosions.

Security at the summit was intensified, with police on heightened alert following the London attacks.

DPA

Subject: German news

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