Far-right German parties forge election alliance

29th October 2004, Comments 0 comments

29 October 2004 , BERLIN - Germany's leading two right-wing extremist parties confirmed Friday they are forging an alliance to bolster their chances of winning seats in the next federal election. The National Democratic Party of Germany (NPD) - which is known for its anti-Semitism and growing links with neo-Nazis - and the German People's Union (DVU) plan to run joint candidates in Germany's 2006 election, said DVU leader Gerhard Frey in an interview with ARD TV. NPD chairman Udo Voigt confirmed the move,

29 October 2004

BERLIN - Germany's leading two right-wing extremist parties confirmed Friday they are forging an alliance to bolster their chances of winning seats in the next federal election.

The National Democratic Party of Germany (NPD) - which is known for its anti-Semitism and growing links with neo-Nazis - and the German People's Union (DVU) plan to run joint candidates in Germany's 2006 election, said DVU leader Gerhard Frey in an interview with ARD TV.

NPD chairman Udo Voigt confirmed the move, said ARD.

Frey indicated that while the two parties would cooperate, they did not plan to merge.

"In the German general election in 2006 the candidates will run under the banner NPD/DVU to underline the alliance. In the next European parliament election they will run under the title DVU/NPD," said Frey, a wealthy Munich publisher who has largely bankrolled the DVU.

Leaders of the DVU and NPD will meet on Sunday at an NPD party congress in the eastern German city of Leinefeld to formally announce the election alliance.

Germany's far-right parties have never won seats in the federal parliament during the post-World War II era. They have, however, repeatedly managed to clear the 5 per cent hurdle needed to win seats in regional assemblies.

In elections last month in economically hard hit eastern states of Saxony and Brandenberg the NPD won over 9 percent and the DVU more than 6 percent respectively. The two parties ran separately with the DVU agreeing not to put up candidates in Saxony and the NPD not running in Brandenburg.

Germany's third major rightist party, the Republikaner, appears to be the odd man out of the new grouping.

The head of Baden-Wuerttemberg state's domestic security agency, Helmut Rannacher, predicted the Republikaner were now likely to lurch into crisis.

Republikaner leaders have vowed not to form alliances with the NPD but local party members are already doing so, noted Rannacher.

DPA

Subject: German news 

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