European report on CIA lacks 'solid facts': US

8th June 2006, Comments 0 comments

8 June 2006, WASHINGTON - A European report on CIA activities in the war on terrorism was devoid of "solid facts" to support allegations and was merely a "rehash" of previous statements, the US State Department said Wednesday.

8 June 2006

WASHINGTON - A European report on CIA activities in the war on terrorism was devoid of "solid facts" to support allegations and was merely a "rehash" of previous statements, the US State Department said Wednesday.

"I don't see any new solid facts in it," spokesman Sean McCormack said. "There seem to be a lot of allegations but no real facts behind it."

The Council of Europe released its report Wednesday on a six-month investigation into allegations the Central Intelligence Agency conducted secret flights of terrorist suspects and operated clandestine prison facilities on European soil.

The investigation concluded that officials in numerous European countries "actively participated with the CIA" in unlawful activities. The report accused Poland and Romania of hosting secret detention facilities, a charge both countries immediately denied.

The report alleged that Sweden, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Britain, Italy, Macedonia, Germany and Turkey were part of a global network assisting the CIA. Cyprus, Ireland, Portugal and Greece also helped, the report said.

It also accused the US government of "judicial apartheid" for depriving non-Americans of legal rights. McCormack said the report appeared "to be a rehash of the previous efforts by this group."

"We're certainly disappointed in the tone and the content of it," McCormack said, adding the report portrays intelligence activities as "inherently bad or illegal."

"It couldn't be further from the truth," he said. "The fact of the matter is, intelligence cooperation between the United States and Europe and between the United States and other countries around the world saves lives in the war on terror."

The investigation was prompted by a Washington Post article in November that first revealed the CIA flights and detention centres on European soil without identifying the countries. The article sparked outrage throughout Europe, which worsened as reports began to implicate government officials for cooperating with the US intelligence agency.

"We believe to have established that it is only through the intentional or grossly negligent collusion of the European partners that this 'web' was able to spread also over Europe," said Dick Marty, who heads the council's investigation.

DPA

Subject: German news

0 Comments To This Article