EasyJet to double passengernumbers in Germany

16th August 2004, Comments 0 comments

16 August 2004 , BERLIN - Low-fare British airline EasyJet expects to double the number of German passengers served next year in a market growing increasingly competitive, company chief executive Ray Webster said. In an interview with Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa in Berlin, Webster said that this year, EasyJet's passenger numbers in Germany - with operations in Berlin, Dortmund and Cologne/Bonn airport - were expected to reach 1.8 million. "We are expecting 3.7 million travellers (next year)," he said, with

16 August 2004

BERLIN - Low-fare British airline EasyJet expects to double the number of German passengers served next year in a market growing increasingly competitive, company chief executive Ray Webster said.

In an interview with Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa in Berlin, Webster said that this year, EasyJet's passenger numbers in Germany - with operations in Berlin, Dortmund and Cologne/Bonn airport - were expected to reach 1.8 million.

"We are expecting 3.7 million travellers (next year)," he said, with EasyJet adding more operations and also aiming to serve new destinations in Germany and elsewhere in Europe. At the moment, much of the business is in serving holiday destinations such as Mallorca.

Webster said that although the demand for low-fare air travel is large, all the same the competition was getting tougher.

"Not all the carriers will survive for long and some will perhaps soon be merging," he said, quickly adding that EasyJet had no such plans to merge with other carriers.

"It's like with large families - the more issues there are to be settled, all the more difficult it becomes to manage them all," Webster said about EasyJet's aim to go it alone.

With EasyJet now operating a European network, the airline is looking to develop new routes not only from Britain, but also from France and Germany, he said. For example, EasyJet will be flying from Berlin to East European destinations in the winter season.

Webster said a further dangerous rival to low-fare flight are high-speed trains. This especially was the case for shorter stretches of three hours or less.

"I do not believe that there is great potential for cheap inner- German flights - except for business travellers," he said. "But the planes must also be booked on weekends as well."

At the same time, EasyJet is not aiming to compete in low-fare overseas routes such as Condor is now doing. The business becomes more complicated when passengers start to expect larger seats and meals on their flights, Webster said.

DPA

Subject: German news
 

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