EU trio cancel planned nuclear meeting with Iran

24th August 2005, Comments 0 comments

24 August 2005, PARIS - The three countries representing the European Union have cancelled the next scheduled meeting with Iran on its nuclear programme because of Tehran's decision to resume nuclear conversion, French media reported Wednesday.

24 August 2005

PARIS - The three countries representing the European Union have cancelled the next scheduled meeting with Iran on its nuclear programme because of Tehran's decision to resume nuclear conversion, French media reported Wednesday.

The decision by France, Germany and Britain to cancel the August 31 meeting was announced late Tuesday by a spokesman for the French foreign ministry, who said Iran's action was in breach of a 2004 agreement in which it agreed to suspend the production of nuclear fuel while negotiating on a permanent agreement.

But the spokesman, Jean-Francois Mattei, said, "This does not mean that there will be no contacts with the Iranians."

The three countries have been negotiating with Iran to convince Tehran to stop all nuclear activities that could lead to the construction of a nuclear bomb.

Earlier this month, Iran rejected a wide-ranging package of economic, technological and political incentives in exchange for the permanent suspension of its nuclear fuel production programme, and subsequently resumed uranium conversion at its Isfahan nuclear plant.

Iran has repeatedly claimed that its nuclear programme has only peaceful aims and that it has the right to pursue it.

In Washington, State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said the United States fully supported the decision to cancel the meeting.

"We believe that Iran should abide by its... commitments," McCormack said. "It has broken those commitments."

In related news, Washington has downplayed a report published Tuesday by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which concluded that contaminated equipment imported from Pakistan was the source of traces of uranium found in Iran two years ago.

A spokesman for the U.S. State Department said the report did nothing to allay fears that Tehran was working on a nuclear weapon, as the administration of President George W. Bush believes.

DPA

Subject: German news

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