DFB completes rulings on match-fixing appeals

30th March 2005, Comments 0 comments

30 March 2005, HAMBURG - Three appeals are still pending, but Germany's ruling football body DFB has all but wrapped up its rulings on games linked with a match-fixing scandal in the country.

30 March 2005

HAMBURG - Three appeals are still pending, but Germany's ruling football body DFB has all but wrapped up its rulings on games linked with a match-fixing scandal in the country.

The DFB ruled on Tuesday night that a second division game between Karlsruhe and Duisburg will not be replayed even though disgraced referee Robert Hoyzer testified to prosecutors that the game's match official Dominik Marks got EUR 30,000 for Duisburg's 3-0 win.

"This was the toughest decision by the DFB sports court I can recall," said presiding judge Rainer Koch.

But he added: "All three Duisburg goals came without influence from the referee, and it's goals that decide a match."

The DFB was flooded with 16 appeals once Hoyzer confessed in late January to have manipulated matches in the lower leagues and German cup and said that other referees were involved in the scheme as well to allow others to place successful bets on the games.

Ten appeals were later withdrawn, the DFB sports court dismissed three others, but also ordered two games - LR Ahlen vs. Wacker Burghausen in the second division and a third division game between the amateur teams of Hertha Berlin and Arminia Bielfeld - to be replayed because of proven manipulation.

Bundesliga club SV Hamburg agreed to EUR 2 million in compensation - EUR 500,000 in cash and EUR 1.5 million in proceedings from a 12 October friendly against China in their stadium - because their manipulated cup game last August in Paderborn could not be replayed.

The DFB sports court completed its look into the manipulated games before Berlin prosecutors dealing with the case came to their conclusions.

"We can't wait until the Berlin justice authorities make their decision. We have to do it now," said Koch.

The DFB had to deal with matches played this season and did not want the affair to further overshadow Germany's preparations to host the 2006 World Cup and the Confederations Cup this June.

A general assembly of the DFB in April will also look into the affair.

Berlin prosecutors are investigating against 25 people on charges of organised and professional fraud in connection with the affair, ranging from referees to players and three men under suspicion to have placed the bets and allegedly made millions of euros through the scheme.

Two of the three men and the referee Marks are behind bars, while Hoyzer, player Steffen Karl and one of the three alleged masterminds behind the scheme were released from custody after being arrested.

Apart from ruling on the 16 games, the DFB have suspended Hoyzer who faces a lifetime ban. Marks, who has so far protested his innocence, could face a similar punishment if found guilty.

But the DFB also came under heavy fire for only reluctantly dealing with the case early on.

A first indication that games could have been manipulated came last August from bookmakers Oddset, but the case did not break until January - leading to heavy criticism on the then sole DFB boss Gerhard Mayer-Vorfelder.

"There were enough hints. It is hardly imaginable from today's point of view that no action was taken earlier," said Peter Dankert, deputy leader of Germany's parliamentary sports commission.

DPA

Subject: German news

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