Controversial Red Army terrorist exhibit opens

28th January 2005, Comments 0 comments

28 January 2005, BERLIN - A controversial exhibit opens on Sunday on Germany's Red Army terrorists who killed over 30 politicians and business leaders from the 1970s to early 1990s. The show in Berlin has drawn bitter criticism from families of those murdered by the Red Army which emerged the 1968 German student protests as a violent guerrilla group based on Marxist and Maoist class struggle. Initially the exhibit was to have been funded with public money and had been given the almost positive title: "Lege

28 January 2005

BERLIN - A controversial exhibit opens on Sunday on Germany's Red Army terrorists who killed over 30 politicians and business leaders from the 1970s to early 1990s.

The show in Berlin has drawn bitter criticism from families of those murdered by the Red Army which emerged the 1968 German student protests as a violent guerrilla group based on Marxist and Maoist class struggle.

Initially the exhibit was to have been funded with public money and had been given the almost positive title: "Legend RAF". For some on Germany's far-left, the RAF still have iconic, pop-cult status.

But a public outcry led to state funds being withdrawn and the reworked exhibit is now privately funded and will taking place under the name: "Presenting terror: The RAF"

The exhibit at the gallery Kunst-Werke includes 100 paintings and photos by some 50 artists who dealt with the RAF in their work including Joseph Beuys, Joerg Immedorff and Gerhard Richter.

Direct comment, description and evaluation of the RAF's left-wing extremist violence will not be included in the exhibit, as had been earlier planned.

An outgrowth of the Baader-Meinhof Gang, the RAF was seen in the 1970s and 1980s as Western Europe's most deadly terrorist group.

Its up to 40 hardcore members who were supported by hundreds of sympathisers. The group also had key support from Middle East extremists and former communist East Germany.

The last wave of RAF assassinations began in 1989 with a bomb attack with killed the chief executive of Deutsche Bank, Alfred Herrhausen.

In 1991 an RAF sniper shot dead the head of the Treuhand privatization agency for former East Germany's state property, Detlev Rohwedder.

But the collapse of communism in the East Bloc and the killing of top RAF gunman Wolfgang Grams by police led to a crisis in the group.

After a final attack where they blew up a new prison with several hundred kilos of explosives in 1993, the RAF ceased operations.

In 1998 the group sent a letter to a news agency - which officials declared genuine - announcing they were disbanding and that the RAF was now "history."

DPA

Subject: German news

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