Commercial flights between Berlin,US resume - cut after 9/11

12th October 2004, Comments 0 comments

12 October 2004 , BERLIN - Two commercial airlines will begin direct service between Berlin and New York next year, ending the German capital's long-criticised lack of direct transatlantic flights, the US airline Continental announced. Continental will start flights from Berlin's Tegel airport on 2 July to Newark airport in New Jersey south of New York City. The US airline Delta announced last week it will begin direct flights on 2 May between Berlin-Tegel and New York's JFK airport. Berlin has not had reg

12 October 2004

BERLIN - Two commercial airlines will begin direct service between Berlin and New York next year, ending the German capital's long-criticised lack of direct transatlantic flights, the US airline Continental announced.

Continental will start flights from Berlin's Tegel airport on 2 July to Newark airport in New Jersey south of New York City.

The US airline Delta announced last week it will begin direct flights on 2 May between Berlin-Tegel and New York's JFK airport.

Berlin has not had regularly scheduled direct flight to the United States since shortly after the 11 September 2001 attacks on the US when Lufthansa cancelled its direct service to Washington.

A Lufthansa spokesman, Thomas Jachnow, said the German airline had no plans to resume transatlantic flights from Berlin.

"The figures don't make it worthwhile for us," said Jachnow adding there are not enough first class and business class passengers flying to and from Berlin.

Lufthansa operates most of its long-haul international flights from Frankfurt, Munich and also Duesseldorf.

Hotel operators and others in Berlin have long complained that the lack of a direct transatlantic flight hurts tourism and commerce in the city.

But wrangles over building a new Berlin airport have helped keep the German capital unattractive to major airlines.

Plans for a new mega-airport have been discussed for 15 years - but neither the financing nor final building approval has been agreed for the multi-billion euro project.

Meanwhile, the city's government is seeking to force the tiny downtown airport, Tempelhof, to close, despite offers by airlines to take over the operating costs.

Local residents don't like the noise of jets taking off and landing but business leaders strongly oppose the planned closure of Tempelhof which is mainly used by small aircraft on short flights within Europe.

Aside from Tegel in former West Berlin, the city's other airport is Schoenefeld, the former East German airport, southeast of the city which is popular with low-cost airlines such Easyjet and Ryanair.

DPA

Subject: German news
 

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