Calls for more CCTV after bomb finds in Germany

3rd August 2006, Comments 0 comments

3 August 2006, BERLIN - The mysterious discovery of two unexploded suitcase bombs on German trains this week brought calls Thursday for more closed-circuit-television (CCTV) monitoring of railway stations. Police still do not know if terrorists or extortionists constructed the bombs, which were planted on trains Monday, but dismantled at stations in Dortmund and Koblenz without injury. They contained timers, petrol and canisters of gas. A federal prosecutions spokesman confirmed a bag of edible starch had

3 August 2006

BERLIN - The mysterious discovery of two unexploded suitcase bombs on German trains this week brought calls Thursday for more closed-circuit-television (CCTV) monitoring of railway stations.

Police still do not know if terrorists or extortionists constructed the bombs, which were planted on trains Monday, but dismantled at stations in Dortmund and Koblenz without injury. They contained timers, petrol and canisters of gas.

A federal prosecutions spokesman confirmed a bag of edible starch had also been found inside.

The news service Focus Online said the bomber may have wanted the white powder to scatter, resembling the white anthrax powder used in attacks that killed five persons in the United States in 2001. But the prosecutor said he would not speculate on its purpose.
On N24 news television, Wolfgang Bosbach, the deputy floor leader of the Christian Democrats in Berlin, said more CCTV monitoring at stations was needed. "The important thing is to use the most modern technology and have enough security personnel," he said.

"CCTV doesn't just help solve crimes, it has a preventive effect," he said. But Social Democratic and Greens politicians criticised him, saying there was no call for draconian security.

The main Deutsche Bahn company already has CCTV on most platforms at the 5,707 stations on its 34,000-kilometre railways network.

German police and railways staff have been jittery since the find, and innocently lost bags have prompted major bomb scares this week.

The US Armed Forces' European Command (Eucom) advised its personnel in Germany Thursday to be cautious during travel.

Prosecutors declined comment on a report on Focus Online that the bombs failed to explode Monday because the gas was excessive. No claim of responsibility for the attempted attacks has been disclosed.

DPA

Subject: German news

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