Berlin signs off on climate protection programme

13th July 2005, Comments 0 comments

13 July 2005, BERLIN - Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's Social Democrat-led government Wednesday signed off on a national climate protection program as a poll showed that the majority of Germans consider climate protection a key issue.

13 July 2005

BERLIN - Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's Social Democrat-led government Wednesday signed off on a national climate protection program as a poll showed that the majority of Germans consider climate protection a key issue.

Moreover the poll, which was drawn up by the Forsa polling institute for Germany's Environment Ministry, show that Germans believe their nation should set a precedent in dismantling the harmful greenhouse gases around the world.

Presented to cabinet by Environment Minister Juergen Trittin, the climate protection program reaffirms the nation's ambitious goal of drastically reducing harmful greenhouse gas emissions by the year 2020.

Trittin is a member of the Greens, the junior member of Schroeder's ruling coalition.

The Forsa poll showed that three quarters of those polled consider an effective climate protection policy as extremely important (37 per cent) or very important (37 per cent).

20 per cent called it quite important, while the remainder said that climate protection should play hardly any or no role at all.

The poll, which was conducted at the start of the month, was based on the responses of 1001 Germans over the age of 14.

The government's move to draw up a national climate protection plan comes as Germany gears up for an early election that is likely to be held in mid-September.

Of those polled by Forsa, 54 per cent said that Germany should act as a trailblazer in pursing climate protection policies, while 42 per cent believed that a total European solution should be found.

The first group principally comprised younger people and supporters of the Social Democrats Party (SDP), the Greens and the small liberal Free Democrats. The second group was chiefly made up of older people as well as those who identify with the conservative Christian Democrat-led opposition.

Those responding to the poll also assessed the personal risks or risks to their family as a result of climate change differently.

49 per cent believed that climate change represented an extremely dangerous (13 per cent) or very dangerous (36 per cent) risk.

However, 35 per cent saw climate change as being only somewhat dangerous. For 10 per cent it posed hardly any risk and for 3 per cent no risk at all. The remainder did not have an opinion.

© DPA with Expatica

Subject: German news

0 Comments To This Article