Berlin extends German troopmandate in Afghanistan

22nd September 2004, Comments 0 comments

22 September 2004 , BERLIN - The German cabinet agreed Wednesday to seek a one- year extension of the mandate for German peacekeeping forces in Afghanistan. The cabinet approved a draft bill to be sent for ratification by parliament next week, with the mandate extension coming at a critical point in the run-up to the 9 October presidential elections in Afghanistan. The current mandate expires on 13 October. Germany currently has 1,550 troops in the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Kabul,

22 September 2004

BERLIN - The German cabinet agreed Wednesday to seek a one- year extension of the mandate for German peacekeeping forces in Afghanistan.

The cabinet approved a draft bill to be sent for ratification by parliament next week, with the mandate extension coming at a critical point in the run-up to the 9 October  presidential elections in Afghanistan. The current mandate expires on 13 October.

Germany currently has 1,550 troops in the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Kabul, 270 in Kundus and 300 in the neighbouring country Uzbekistan.

The total of 2,130 is short of the current parliamentary mandate for up to 2,250 soldiers.
German Defence Minister Peter Struck said during parliamentary defence committee hearings that forces in Afghanistan should be beefed up for the presidential elections.

Afterwards, it could be seen whether the security situation stabilises itself as a result of a democratically-elected president, he said.

The conservative political opposition Christian Democratic Union/Christian Social Union is pushing the Berlin government to boost the German troop numbers up to the full 2,250 strength provided in the current mandate.

In particular, the opposition wants the number of Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) troops in Kundus and Feisabad to be increased. The current mandate provides for up to 450 German troops for the PRT in the Kundus region.

DPA

Subject: German news
 

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