Bavarian neo-Nazis 'reorganising'

9th August 2004, Comments 0 comments

9 August 2004 , MUNICH - Neo-Nazis in Bavaria are "reorganising" in a bid to make a comeback following crushing raids against them in recent years, German authorities warned Monday. "Things are definitely in flux in the Bavarian neo-Nazi scene," said Robert Bihler, an investigator specialising in neo-Nazi prosecutions in the southern-most state in Germany. He confirmed that a notorious right-wing radical Robert Bihler, formed a new grouping in May that comprises about a score of individuals in Bavarian an

9 August 2004  

MUNICH - Neo-Nazis in Bavaria are "reorganising" in a bid to make a comeback following crushing raids against them in recent years, German authorities warned Monday.

"Things are definitely in flux in the Bavarian neo-Nazi scene," said Robert Bihler, an investigator specialising in neo-Nazi prosecutions in the southern-most state in Germany.
He confirmed that a notorious right-wing radical Robert Bihler, formed a new grouping in May that comprises about a score of individuals in Bavarian and perhaps more than 50 persons nationwide.

"Bordin clearly is seeking to create a new forum for neo-Nazi hate ideology," Bihler said.

The warning came after federal authorities in Germany indicted four neo-Nazis on terrorism charges in connection with a plot last November to blow up a Munich synagogue during cornerstone-laying ceremonies attended by dignitaries.

German federal prosecutor General Kay Nehm said the four included Southern Comrades neo-Nazi group leader Martin Wiese, 28, and three of his followers, also in their 20s.

According to Nehm, the evidence showed the Munich group had plotted to set off a bomb on the building site near the Jakobsplatz square to disrupt the cornerstone-laying ceremonies last 9 November.

They had purchased explosives in Poland and tested them in small blasts. Police seized 14 kilogrammes of explosives in September including 1.4 kilogrammes of TNT high explosive. The group had intended to hide their bomb in a sewer pipe under the site.

In mid-August last year, the plot was dropped when several of the neo-Nazis were questioned by police about assaults. As that inquiry continued, police gradually realized how dangerous the group was, made arrests in September, and discovered the explosives.

Nehm said the group had also vaguely contemplated setting off a bomb in the Marienplatz, Munich's main square and a magnet for tourists. It also considered attacking persons it considered leftist, including the state Social Democratic leader, Franz Maget.

The date of the synagogue foundation ceremony - 9 November - is full of symbolism: It was 65 years after Kristallnacht on 9 November 1938, when Nazi thugs vandalized synagogues all over Germany, burning a number down, and turning a policy of persecution of Jews into naked violence.

Nehm said the group variously called itself the "Southern Comrades" or "Southern Operations Bureau" and formed two years ago to pursue its political aims with the help of weapons and explosives.

They gathered every Sunday for target practice with airguns and did military drills in woods southwest of Munich.

DPA

Subject: German news
 

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