AU summit setback for German UN seat bid

5th August 2005, Comments 0 comments

5 August 2005, ADDIS ADABA - An extraordinary summit convened by the African Union (A.U.) to consider United Nations reform failed Thursday night to reach a consensus on the African stand on the proposed increase of U.N. Security Council seats. After a marathon debate the summit decided to retain the position African leaders had endorsed at the A.U. summit held early last month in Site, Libya, that proposes to increase membership of the Security Council seats from 15 to 26. Six of the new members would hav

5 August 2005

ADDIS ADABA - An extraordinary summit convened by the African Union (A.U.) to consider United Nations reform failed Thursday night to reach a consensus on the African stand on the proposed increase of U.N. Security Council seats.

After a marathon debate the summit decided to retain the position African leaders had endorsed at the A.U. summit held early last month in Site, Libya, that proposes to increase membership of the Security Council seats from 15 to 26. Six of the new members would have permanent seats with veto rights.

The proposal seeks two permanent seats with veto rights and one rotating seat for Africa.
At the end of deliberations, the summit established a 10-member heads of state committee, with the task of lobbying the United Nations in support of the African proposal in time for September vote by the 191 members of the U.N. General Assembly.

Two countries each from the five regions of the continent were nominated on a regional basis to serve with the committee.

Sierra Leone and Senegal were chosen from West Africa; Namibia and Zambia from Southern Africa; and Kenya and Uganda from East Africa.

The North and Central Africa group of countries have been given until Friday to select their representatives.

As the summit ended after 6 hours without a break, according to conference sources, the 40 attendees the summit were evenly divided over whether or not to revise the A.U. stand endorsed by the summit at Sirte in order to make it compatible with other proposals.

Current A.U. chairman and Nigerian President Olusengu Obasanjo insisted on a "synchronizing" of the African stand with that of other regions of the world.

The delegations from Nigeria, South Africa, Zambia and Ethiopia supported Obasanjo, saying the African Group at the U.N. needed to negotiate with other groups to win support.

Delegations who took the opposite view included those from Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Senegal, Kenya, Sudan and Uganda, sources said.

Other groups presenting proposals on Security Council enlargement include the Group of Four (Brazil, Germany, India and Japan) and the Consensus Group of 12 states (which include Argentina, Canada, Italy, South Korea and Turkey).

DPA

Subject: German news

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