9/11 lawyer sets out limits for German court

2nd March 2005, Comments 0 comments

2 March 2005, HAMBURG - A lawyer employed by the US congressional inquiry into the 11 September 2001 attacks advised a German court on Wednesday he would have to withhold some testimony at the trial of Mounir al-Motassadeq, who was convicted of being an accomplice in the terrorist strikes against the US.

2 March 2005

HAMBURG - A lawyer employed by the US congressional inquiry into the 11 September  2001 attacks advised a German court on Wednesday he would have to withhold some testimony at the trial of Mounir al-Motassadeq, who was convicted of being an accomplice in the terrorist strikes against the US. 

Moroccan-born Motassadeq, who is free on bail, is being re-tried after his original conviction and sentence to 15 years in jail was overturned on appeal.

In a 1 March fax read aloud in court, Dietrich Snell, a former deputy attorney general in New York state, said he would fly to Hamburg and take the witness stand next week, but was not authorised to speak on some topics.

He could not offer information from documents classified as secret by US law, nor could he make any statement about the interrogation of "members of the 9/11 conspiracy and other persons".

The case against Motassadeq trial turns on statements to interrogators by alleged conspirators Ramzi bin al-Shibh and Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, whose place of detention has never been disclosed.

As a team leader and senior counsel employed by the US congressman, Snell is reported to have been the author of key parts of the commission's best-selling report. Snell said he would base his testimony on that report.

The Motassadeq trial heard testimony at the end of January from an FBI agent who listed 18 topics on which he was forbidden to testify. Federal judges said the court had been denied access to evidence from US sources.
DPA

Subject: German news
 

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