2006 sees further drop in asylum applications: UN

19th September 2006, Comments 0 comments

19 September 2006, GENEVA - The number of asylum applications in most industrialized countries continued to fall in 2005, according to the latest data published on Tuesday by the UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR. Last year saw the lowest number of asylum seekers since 1987 in the 36 industrialized countries to provide information, and figures for the first half of 2006 indicated they were set to fall even further, according to UNHCR. A total of 134,900 asylum applications were submitted up to September 2006 in Eur

19 September 2006

GENEVA - The number of asylum applications in most industrialized countries continued to fall in 2005, according to the latest data published on Tuesday by the UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR.

Last year saw the lowest number of asylum seekers since 1987 in the 36 industrialized countries to provide information, and figures for the first half of 2006 indicated they were set to fall even further, according to UNHCR.

A total of 134,900 asylum applications were submitted up to September 2006 in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand and Japan - 14 per cent less than the same period last year.

In Europe, 97,000 applications were submitted, almost a fifth less than during the same six months in 2005.

The trend was also reflected across the European Union member countries, excluding Italy, which saw a fall of around 20 per cent to 89,000 new applications, compared with the same period in 2005.

The United States received the largest number of asylum applications, 25,500 or 20 per cent of the total lodged in industrialized countries. France was second with 16,400, Britain had 13,900, Germany 10,600 and Canada 10,100.

The main countries of origin for asylum seekers were China, 8,800, followed by Iraq, 8,500, Serbia and Montenegro, 8,000 and the Russian Federation, 6,900.

The number of Iraqi applicants was up 50 per cent compared with the same period a year ago, the UNHCR said.

DPA

Subject: German news

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