2005 Tour de France to go through Germany

28th October 2004, Comments 0 comments

28 October 2004 PARIS - The route for the 2005 Tour de France was announced by organisers at the Palais de Congres in Paris Thursday and will start with a 19 kilometre time trial on the French island of Noirmoutier and will also have two stages in Germany. The 3,584 kilometre long Tour will not have a prologue and will instead start with the first of 21 stages on 2 July in Fromentine on the tiny Atlantic island with the 4th stage a 66km long team time trial from Tours to Blois. The 7th and 8th stages will

28 October 2004
PARIS - The route for the 2005 Tour de France was announced by organisers at the Palais de Congres in Paris Thursday and will start with a 19 kilometre time trial on the French island of Noirmoutier and will also have two stages in Germany.

The 3,584 kilometre long Tour will not have a prologue and will instead start with the first of 21 stages on 2 July in Fromentine on the tiny Atlantic island with the 4th stage a 66km long team time trial from Tours to Blois.

The 7th and 8th stages will pass through Germany, with a stop in Karlsruhe on July 8 and a start in the city of Pforzheim the next day.

"We decided on Germany because the spectator interest is so great there," Tour de France director Jean-Marie Leblanc said.

Robust climbers will apparently have an advantage on the course of the 92nd Tour which will have nine mountain stages and three finishes at altitude.

The 15th stage in the Pyrenees from Lezat-sur-Leze to Pau will be the toughest mountain stage with six climbs in total.

In addition to traversing the Pyrenees and Alps as usual, the 2005 edition will also go through the Vosges Mountains in eastern France.

The Tour will not visit L'Alpe d'Huez this time around but finishes as usual on the Champs Elysees on 24 July. There will be a 55km time-trial in St. Etienne on the penultimate stage with organisers hoping the race will be open until the end.

A notable absentee at the presentation of the 2005 Tour was American Lance Armstrong, who last year became the first rider to win the Tour six times.

According to Leblanc, the 33-year-old American was kept away because of "family reasons".

Armstrong's participation in next year's remains uncertain. Dirk DeMol, one of the sporting directors of Armstrong's team, said Thursday that he would decide in February or March if he will attempt to win a seventh consecutive Tour in 2005.

Rival Jan Ullrich's T-Mobile team co-manager Olaf Ludwig believes the course will suit his man as does Ullrich's adviser Rudy Pevenage.

"As always, it's very challenging," said Pevenage in Paris. "The long time trial at the beginning and the Germany sections speak up for Jan."

This year's Giro d'Italia winner Damiano Cunego, considered the sport's hottest new talent, was present in Paris and confirmed his presence next year.

"I plan to make my Tour debut," said the 23-year-old Italian.

DPA

Subject: German news
 

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