Security service 'a threat to public privacy'

28th June 2005, Comments 0 comments

28 June 2005, BRUSSELS — The federal government wants to establish a 'super intelligence service' (Coda), but the new organisation is considered a threat to public privacy.

28 June 2005

BRUSSELS — The federal government wants to establish a 'super intelligence service' (Coda), but the new organisation is considered a threat to public privacy.

The Belgian privacy commission has advised Justice Minister Laurette Onkelinx that Coda might represent a violation of privacy regulations.

The government plans to allow Coda the right to gather information about people if that data is relevant in the battle against terrorism.
 
"But the new service will be inundated with sensitive information it is not legally allowed to have," the commission said.

Several nations granted greater powers to their national intelligence services following the 11 September attacks in the US in 2001.

Many critics have raised concern about 'Big Brother' tactics, but it is the first time that these concerns have been raised in Belgium, newspaper 'De Tijd' reported on Tuesday.
 
Minister Onkelinx is drawing up a legislative proposal to establish Coda (known in Dutch as the Coördinatieorgaan voor de Dreigingsanalyse or Threat Analysis Co-Ordination Point in English.)

The service will be instructed to gather information over "terrorist and extremist threats" posed against Belgium.

This information will not only come from police and the nation's existing intelligence services, but also from federal government ministries such as Finance (customs), Transport, Interior (immigration matters) and Foreign Affairs.

[Copyright Expatica News 2005]

Subject: Belgian news

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