Paris' latest star is no damp squid

26th March 2008, Comments 0 comments

France's National Museum of Natural History on Tuesday unveiled the world's first "plastinated" squid - a 6.5-metre-long deep-sea beast

   PARIS, March 26, 2008  - France's National Museum of Natural History
on Tuesday unveiled the world's first "plastinated" squid -- a 6.5-metre-long
(21.25-feet) deep-sea beast donated by New Zealand and named in honour of a creature featuring in Maori legend.
   Plastination entails replacing the animal's water, fat and other liquids
with a polymer that hardens.
   It means the specimen can be appreciated in three dimensions in a dry,
solid state, rather than in a jar filled with formalin or alcohol, whose glass
distorts the view.
   The squid was hauled up in January 2000 at a depth of 615 metres (2,000
feet) by fishermen off New Zealand.
   It has been baptised Wheke, after Te Wheke o Muturangi, which according to
Maori mythology was a sea monster that drew Polynesians in an ocean-going
canoe to Aotearoa, "the land of the long white cloud," as New Zealand is known
in its native tongue.
   The 65,000-euro (100,000-dollar) plastination, carried out by Italian lab
VisDocta Research, took two and a half years, during which the specimen of
Architeuthis sanctipauli lost 2.5 metres (seven feet) of its length through
drying out.
   Wheke is being given pride of place in the Paris museum's Great Gallery of
Evolution, its centrepiece exhibit on biodiversity.
   The giant squid, Architeuthis, of which there are three sub-species, is a
potent source of maritime tales of tentacled monsters able to grab a ship and
pull it down to its doom. The critter memorably featured in Jules Vernes'
"20,000 Leagues Under the Sea," trying to engulf the submarine Nautilus.
   In real life, though, the species is rather less gigantic -- about 13
metres (42.25 feet) from the caudal fin to the tip of its suckered tentacles.
Females are larger than males.
   The colossal squid, Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni, is bit bigger, though. At
around 14 metres (45.5 feet) in length, it is the planet's biggest
invertebrate.

AFP 

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