No evidence of faulty Airbus speed sensors

22nd June 2009, Comments 0 comments

French investigators probing the June 1 crash of an Air France Airbus 330 over the Atlantic have said that the airspeed sensors, or pitot probes, had been feeding inconsistent readings to the cockpit.

Berlin -- The European Aviation Safety Agency said on Friday there was insufficient evidence at present to require that airspeed sensors be replaced on all Airbus 330 planes after the Air France disaster.

"Pending further results of the accident investigation, we continue our technical evaluation which, today, does not merit a specific mandatory measure," Daniel Hoeltgen from the Cologne, Germany based EASA told AFP.

French investigators probing the June 1 crash of an Air France Airbus 330 over the Atlantic have said that the airspeed sensors, or pitot probes, had been feeding inconsistent readings to the cockpit.

Conflicting airspeed data can cause the autopilot to shut down and in extreme cases the plane to stall or fly dangerously fast, possibly causing a high-altitude breakup.

But the French bureau leading the investigation, along with Airbus and Air France, have said there is yet no firm evidence linking the speed monitors and the crash of Air France Flight 447 between Rio de Janeiro and Paris.

Air France has upgraded all sensors on its long-haul fleet as precautionary measure after protests from pilots.

All 228 people on board Flight 447 are presumed dead, and 50 bodies have so far been recovered, along with the plane's tail fin and hundreds of other parts and pieces.

AFP/Expatica

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