Belgian news in brief, 24 November 2005

24th November 2005, Comments 0 comments

Shortage of network specialists There is currently a shortage of 2,700 IT network specialists in Belgium and that number is expected to increase to about 10,000 in coming years, a joint study by network infrastructure maker Cisco and research bureau IDC has revealed. The shortage was attributed to the rapid growth of the IT industry and e-government, but also due to the lack of study programmes, newspaper 'De Standaard' reported. By 2008, Europe will have a shortage of 500,000 specialists, Cisco said on Th

Shortage of network specialists
 
There is currently a shortage of 2,700 IT network specialists in Belgium and that number is expected to increase to about 10,000 in coming years, a joint study by network infrastructure maker Cisco and research bureau IDC has revealed. The shortage was attributed to the rapid growth of the IT industry and e-government, but also due to the lack of study programmes, newspaper 'De Standaard' reported. By 2008, Europe will have a shortage of 500,000 specialists, Cisco said on Thursday.
 
Denial over Ryanair tax fraud claims

A director of the company that operates Charleroi Airport BSCA, Laurent Jossart, denied on Wednesday there is anything wrong with the contract between Ryanair and Promocy, the company that promotes the regional airport. Ryanair also denied allegations of tax avoidance and said it will fully-co-operate with the Charleroi public prosecutor's inquiries.

Minor rail delays in Brussels

Technical problems with two trains disrupted Brussels rail transport on Thursday morning. A passenger train ground to a halt in Nossegem at about 8am and had to be transported back to Leuven. Brussels-bound trains were diverted via Mechelen, leading to delays. In Weerde, a short circuit halted a freight train on the Brussels-Mechelen line at about 9.20am. The train engineer quickly put out the resulting fire and the train was able to start moving again 15 minutes later. Rail delays were resolved later in the day.

Mass thefts of Christmas trees
  
Christmas trees are expensive and are becoming an increasing target of professional thieves. A spokesman for the association or ornamental plant cultivators, Bart Boeraeve, said the number of thefts has increased in the past two years. It is estimated that 300,000 to 400,000 Christmas trees disappear in the lead-up to Christmas. That amounts to EUR 10 million. About one in 10 trees sold in Belgium is stolen.

[Copyright Expatica News 2005]

Subject: Belgian news

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